Big words...

I love learning new words. I am somewhat of a wordsmith, but I do not like to have to read an article or text book with a dictionary in the other hand. Use of words is truly important because if used out of sync to the meaning, then it only makes the user of the word look foolish. Since the word euphonious is an adjective meaning melodious, to say an euphonious keeps you smart would make a musician laugh and a professor scratch his head.

I have tested some of my stories with the grammatical feature on Word and find that with some I'm writing at a 5th grade level and with others, I'm at 10th grade. One has to wonder what makes the grammatical thing tick? Is it the use of big words? Is it the length of sentences? It certainly isn't the subject matter per se. I'm just wondering...

4 comments:

Stan said...

I'm a lover of the language myself. My mother loves to quip that I'm a "wordsmith" ... because I write and because I'm a Smith. As a wordsmith, then, I do need to point out that "euphonious" is an adjective and you used it as a noun. ;)

Oh, and on that Word feature, one time I typed in a passage from Scripture. It told me that I should certainly make it easier to read. I thought, "I think you'd better talk to the Author about that."

Gina Burgess said...

hmmmm.... I thought I said that it was an adjective?

However, I was glad to learn this new word euphonious. I believe the birds of the air create a euphonious cacophony early in the morning. But that is an oxymoron.

Stan said...

Just for clarification (and especially because I liked the "euphonious cacophony"), you said it was an adjective, but you wrote, "... an euphonious keeps you smart ..." which uses the word as a noun.

Gina Burgess said...

Yes... exactly. To use it as a noun would make a musician laugh and a professor to scratch his head or give you a bad grade for not listening or using a word correctly.

Big words can get you into trouble.